10% of the population of France may have Googled “GDPR” in May!

 

Now Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad GDPR?

Back in December, I wrote a blog post about how Google Analytics keyword searches for the term “GDPR“, variants, and local language equivalents, could be used as an indicator of the relative interests that countries have in GDPR in the two years from November 2017 to October 2017.

I won’t reiterate the results – you can still see them here – other than to say that despite opinion to the contrary, the US generated the second highest number of searches, surpassed only by the UK.

With the GDPR deadline now having passed, I thought it would be interesting to update the study to see how, or if, things have changed. Using a similar methodology I looked at the number of times Google was searched for the term “GDPR” (plus permutations of this, and the local language equivalent) on a monthly basis in the 12 months running up to the May 2018 deadline.

Raw

The results broadly mirrored the earlier study, and almost every country showed a doubling of searches in May compared to April. Again the UK were the highest, followed by the USA.

However, all of these countries differ widely in terms of size of population. By looking at the number of searches per capita (dividing the number of searches by the population of the country, a different figure emerges.

per capita

Using these data, The US has the lowest number of searches per head of population and the UK is now second highest. However, the runaway ‘winner ‘ is now France, by a factor of three times that of the UK.

Extrapolating from this, if we make the gross assumption that each search in a country was carried out by a different person, it is possible that almost 10% (9.7%)of the population of France Googled “GDPR” in May!

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